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    Stable 2.4.0
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XML, XSLT
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As mentioned above, Embperl now contains a provider for doing XSLT transformations. More XML will come in the next releases. The easiest thing is to use the XSLT stuff thru the predefined recipes:

 

EmbperlLibXSLT

 

the result of Embperl will run thru the Gone libxslt

 

EmbperlXalanXSLT

 

the result of Embperl will run thru Xalan-C

 

EmbperlXSLT

 

the result of Embperl will run thru the XSL transformer given by xsltproc or EMBPERL_XSLTPROC

 

LibXSLT

 

run source thru the Gone libxslt

 

XalanXSLT

 

run source thru Xalan-C

 

XSLT

 

run source thru the XSL transformer given by xsltproc or

 

EMBPERL_XSLTPROC

For example, including the result of an XSLT transformation into your html page could look like this:

    <html><head><title>Include XML via XSLT</title></head>
    <body>

    <h1>Start xml</h1>
    [- Execute ({inputfile => 'foo.xml', recipe => 'EmbperlXalanXSLT', xsltstylesheet => 'foo.xsl'}) ; -]
    <h1>END</h1>

    </body>
    </html>

As you already guessed, the xsltstylesheet parameter gives the name of the xsl file. You can also use the EMBPERL_XSLTSTYLESHEET configuration directive to set it from your configuration file.

By setting EMBPERL_ESCMODE (or $escmode) to 15 you get the correct escaping for XML.


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